Features:  Controls

 
 

    

     Home

    Features
        Bridges
        Necks
        Pickups
        Body Styles
        Controls
               
Blend
          Coil Selector Switch
          Phase Reversal
          Tone Knob
          Volume

    How Clef Began

    Clef's Purpose

    Testimonials

    Video Links

    Pricing


 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controls

        The Clef advantages, when it comes to its controls, are numerous.  And with just three knobs and three switches, you’ll be amazed at what you can do with them.

                  Blend 
       
As said before, the blend control mixes between the two coils (North and South polarity) selected by the two three-way switches.

                  Coil Selector Switch
         
Every
Clef Guitar includes three North polarity coils and three South, six coils in all.  The switch closest to the bridge selects which North coil is used, and the one next to it is the switch for the South coils; both are in close proximity to each other for ease of use, either separately or together.  In essence, you can get any North coil combined with any South coil, nine selections in all.  From there the two switches’ different outputs head straight to the blend control where they can be mixed.  With very little time logged on a Clef, you’ll be getting around these switches with ease.   

                  Phase Reversal
       
Next is the phase reversal switch, a very useful tool in the player’s arsenal.

                 Tone Knob
       
The tone control is typical, a variable low-pass filter which cuts the highs.

                  Volume
       
Clef’s
volume knob is not at all typical.  The beginning half of its rotation (from wide open to its center detent) is continuously changing the value of the pot, lowering its resistance.  After detent, it becomes a regular volume control.  Why lower the resistance?  The less resistance there is between the pot’s output and ground, the more the highs are attenuated, making the sound softer, with no loss in volume.  This does not cut the highs in the same way that the tone control does.  It really has to be experienced to understand its value.  Players who like a darker sound will enjoy this subtle feature.